Sunday, March 25, 2007

Germans and their cars

I´ve made an observation lately. Stephan allows me to drive over the weekends, so I really take the opportunity to practise my left-hand driving. Since we use a manual car, I had to get used to the changing of the gears and having to start the car on half-clutch when I´m on slopes - something that I really dread, but that I´m getting better in.

Today though, I drove for about an hour, since we had to drop off a letter at one of our youth´s place- which was at Eberdingen, about 30 mins away from where we stay. On my way there, I kept noticing that drivers kept overtaking me- even though I was driving at the speed limit - aka, any faster and I would be exceeding the speed limit. Plus, in general, drivers are simply so impatient! I was waiting to turn left at a junction and there was another car waiting to turn into my lane. Hence, this driver - a female one, had to wait for me to turn before she could turn. I waited for an oncoming car to pass by before attempting to turn left and I didn´t accelerate like crazy while turning - there´s no need for that anyway. What happened? This woman driver lifted her hands and waved angrily - a gesture indicating "What the heck do you think you are doing" and she stared at me through the car window. I reacted of course, feeling quite pissed off at her impatience and excess "openness about her anger" and I stared at her through the window too and raised my hands, to indicate that I wasn´t too pleased at her either. I mean, what the heck? I had the right of way and if she had to wait, so wait! I was waiting for the car to pass by and I didn´t want to get into an accident because of some impatient prick!

Anyways, Stephan was like "forget about it, nothing to get angry about" and I was like "What the heck!" Feeling quite pissed off and sorry for myself. Then I started on my tirade of "Man, these germans and their cars. Who do they think are.... kinna thing"...... Sometimes though, I forget that my husband is german and naturally, he´d feel personally affected when I make these type of general, thoughtless statements. I mean, I doubt that drivers in Singapore are much different either, but somehow when I´m driving in a foreign land, it just feels like every bad experience I have, I tend to generalise to the entire population. Had a discussion with Stephan later when we were both more cool-headed and I was no longer fuming over this driving incident. We both agreed that in general, Germans are simply proud of their cars and their driving - this translates to be intolerant of people who don´t seem to drive as good as they think a driver should drive. It makes sense though, since germans are the inventors of cars and Stephan did have a good point that Michael Schumahe is a german and he basically rules the world of Formula 1. For myself, I need to really ask God to change my heart and to be more gracious when I´m driving. I think under normal circumstances, when I have time to think and reflect on what people say, I can be more rational and analyze my reactions. However, when I´m driving and I´m focussing on the road, I think that´s when all my horns come out. Dear God, please help me to control my anger when I´m driving and to choose to be forgiving and loving to those who honk me and show their hands at me. In Jesus Name, Amen.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hi Pris,

Joyce here from PwC Singapore. Just came across your blog. Wonderful to know you are coping well in Germany.

Priscilla Tews said...

hi dear Joyce! =)
Nice to hear from you! How are you? Any likelihood of coming over to Germany? Wld be great to meet up!

Candy Spooner said...

I have the same problem in the US... in the sense that I find something about Americans that disgust me and I rattle on as if all Americans are like that and as if that never happens in Malaysia... one is sleeping around and having children out of wedlock. It's so rampant in the US... even among Christians - when they were young and had fallen away from their faith.

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